Change Region:South Africa

Special Reports

Serving Meals That Make a Difference

Hineni, a community kitchen in the center of Jerusalem, offers hot daily meals for the elderly and poor, serving hundreds of needy recipients every day, both on-site and through home deliveries. (The name Hineni comes from the Hebrew word for “Here am I”).

Normally, this social outreach restaurant has a small full-time staff of a couple managers and cooks, and they rely on foreign Christian volunteers to come in from abroad and assist with preparing and serving the meals. Many of their volunteers are Dutch Christians, who faithfully serve at different times of the year in Jerusalem.

But the Coronavirus lockdowns and travels bans have prevented some of the regular staff from getting to work, while the foreign Christian volunteers have been unable to reach Israel to serve their time at Hineni. Without the normal staff and these Christian helpers, the kitchen would have to close down, and hundreds would be without food. This is where the staff of the International Christian Embassy Jerusalem comes in!

Over recent months, the ICEJ staff have been rotating in to serve each day at Hineni and keep it open to feed the hungry and unfortunate, including a number of Holocaust survivors. Each day, at least three or four Embassy staffers are on-site, cutting vegetables, scooping up plates of food, and packing meals for home delivery. Even during the strictest lockdowns, the ICEJ staff were still considered essential workers and could come serve and package meals.

Benjamin Philip, the founder and director of Hineni, has been thrilled and relieved by the help of the ICEJ.

“Truthfully, I must say that you have been sent by God. I cannot say it differently,” he recently stated. “At the time when Corona started, we would have had to close down because our own workers and regular volunteers were unable to help due to various reasons. But the ICEJ came every day, which allowed us to stay open and continue to provide Israelis in need with daily help even in remote areas.”

“Hineni works closely with the Jerusalem social welfare department to provide hot meals and daily necessities to those in need,” Benjamin added. “Without the help of the ICEJ, it would have been literally impossible to do.”

Ryan Tsuen, the ICEJ’s graphic designer, has been excited to serve the Lord here in Jerusalem in this different way.

“For myself, the opportunity to volunteer with Hineni was an immediate Yes!,” said Ryan. “Back in Canada, I volunteered with a small charity which also served meals to those in need. We saw the immediate impact of providing food to those living below the welfare margin. So, when the chance to do something like that here in Jerusalem came up, I did not hesitate.”

“I realize the need for a nutritious meal, and Hineni does not disappoint,” he added. “They provide take-away trays as well as a sit-down meals for their patrons. Seeing the different ones come in is very special, because we don’t know the details of their background, or their challenges, but we know we are called to love others as Christ loves us. And when given the opportunity to love through this act of service, what more can you ask for?”

Irene Sands, housing manager for the ICEJ staff, is also grateful for this unique opportunity to serve the needy in Jerusalem.

“It has been special over the past few weeks to serve at Hineni,” said Irene. “Our work includes cutting vegetables and the ‘hugest’ sweet potatoes I have ever seen, packing boxed lunches for delivery, serving meals and helping to clean the venue afterwards. It has been refreshing and enlightening, working with the staff there and it is wonderful to see Jews, Christians and even their Arab Muslim cooks working together in unity.”

“It is always a blessing to serve those less fortunate than ourselves, and it warms my heart to see a smile appear from offering them more soup or pouring their water for them. As Mother Theresa said: ‘It’s the small acts of kindness that echo into eternity’. To treat them with dignity and to show love, is so important.”

Irene also noted: “I have enjoyed working with other ICEJ staff members who I do not usually work with that much, learning more about their lives and discussing their latest activities, all while dishing up food! It can be more physically trying than office work, but great teamwork helps.”

She added: “I want to say a word of thanks to the ICEJ’s supporters worldwide for enabling our staff to have this special opportunity at this unique time. I am most grateful.”

Indeed, it is such a blessing for the ICEJ to be the hands and feet of our Christian supporters here in Israel. Thanks to you, we are able to answer the Lord: “Here am I.”

Please consider a generous gift to the ongoing social aid work of the ICEJ during this time of the Corona crisis.

A lifelong journey to Israel

Thanks to the generosity of Christians worldwide, we made it! In the month of July, the International Christian Embassy Jerusalem brought 283 Jewish immigrants on Aliyah flights to Israel. This means we were able to meet the challenge last month in our ‘Rescue250’ campaign of funding evacuation flights for at least 250 Jews each month while Coronavirus is still impacting the world.

With all the negative reports associated with Corona, it is exciting to share such good news! And in fact, over the past five months the Christian Embassy has managed to bring 1,349 Jewish immigrants on flights to Israel arranged through the Jewish Agency.

We also would like to share with you the touching story of the Mashevskaya family, who came to Israel recently on one of the ICEJ’s Aliyah flights. After Lera Mashevskaya, her husband Ivan, and their three children (Slavik, Adrian and Alice) made Aliyah, they stayed in a special quarantine hotel for two weeks. This gave them time to reflect on the long journey which took them through a family crisis and into their new beginning here in Israel.

When Lera was 13 years old, she went to a Jewish Agency summer camp for Jewish youths in Russia. It was there that for the first time Lera felt like she was really Jewish, and started learning about the history and traditions of her people.

At that moment, a burning desire was kindled in Lera’s heart to go to Israel. But her mother was totally against it. It would take another thirteen years for her dream to start coming true. Her first visit to Israel happened as part of a ten-day Taglit (Birthright) tour of Israel granted to young Diaspora Jews.

“At the time, I had already met my husband Ivan. We soon became the parents of our first son – Slavik”, recounted Lera. “I passionately wanted to make Aliyah, but Ivan would have nothing of it.”

The next time Lera came to Israel was on her 29th birthday. By this time, she and Ivan had two children. But Ivan still had reservations about moving to Israel. Deeply torn but sensing an unmistakable draw to Israel, Lera left the two young ones with her husband and mother, and came for another visit.

“It was very hard, but I wanted to give Israel a real try, on my own”, she confided. “I had a deep love in my heart for this country and longed to move here.”

Lera spent four months in Israel as part of the MASA program which helps young Jews abroad come to Israel to further their university studies. She used the opportunity to receive training in a new profession and was certified as a personal life coach. The skills Lera learned were in high demand back in Russia, and with this new education the family’s circumstances changed.

“Nearly all of my MASA classmates made Aliyah, taking on new Hebrew names and starting to build new lives in the Jewish homeland”, said Lera. “I, on the other hand, had to return to my family in snowy Moscow. But I went to work as a coach in an international company, thanks to my MASA degree. And because of this turn for the better, my husband began to see Israel differently.”

Then in the spring of 2019, with Lera six-months pregnant with her third child, the whole family came to Israel as tourists.

“I showed them my favorite places in my beloved country”, said Lera. “For two weeks, we drove from Acre to Eilat, dipped our legs in the Dead Sea, visited Jerusalem and prayed at the Kotel, and danced on the beaches of Tel Aviv. During this trip, my husband began to really like Israel, but he still was not ready to leave Moscow.”

But finally this spring, the Coronavirus pandemic changed his mind.

“My husband started working online, without visiting the office. Our family spent all our days together, our relationships grew closer and closer”, Lera explained. “My husband realized that he could do his work from anywhere in the world and he agreed to make Aliyah. Finally, my dream came true – on June 16 we flew to Israel!”

Lera and Ivan have come a long way as a couple and now want to help others overcome their differences. So they created the “Family Coaching Project” to coach other couples. Even during their two weeks of quarantine after arriving in Israel, they were counseling other immigrant families in the quarantine hotel.

“We so want to become a family that will be useful for this State and its wonderful people. In response to the love and care that we received, I want to love, give and care for others in response three times over”, Lera concluded.

We are so glad that through the ICEJ, Christians have played a central role in changing the lives of so many Jewish immigrants to Israel – like Lera and her family. And with August now upon us, we want to challenge you once again to partner with us in bringing at least 250 more Jews to Israel this month. You can reserve a place on an Aliyah rescue flight for a Jewish person or family in need.

This is a prophetic and humanitarian mission, and you can help keep the door of Aliyah open even amid the Corona crisis.

Book a seat today for a Jewish family in need of our help! And follow our progress in this urgent Rescue250 campaign! Go to: on.icej.org/rescue250

  

Learning is a click away

All of our lives have been disrupted in some way by the Coronavirus pandemic, including a whole generation of children forced to learn remotely from home. But for children of disadvantaged families in Ma’ale Adumim, located just east of Jerusalem, this disruption was felt even more when their school closed during the nationwide lockdowns here in Israel. These children suddenly found themselves experiencing the stress of being unable to attend classes, as their families had no computers at home. Thus they were falling behind their classmates, who were able to continue their studies online.

The Israeli Ministry of Education embarked upon a project, “A Computer for Every Child”, to ensure that all children had access to a computer at home. However, to participate in the project, each municipality has had to contribute towards purchasing computers for disadvantaged families in their town, with each family also making a modest contribution towards the cost.

The city of Ma’ale Adumim identified 75 families who qualified for the program. Many of these families are immigrant and single-parent households who generally find it difficult to pay even the most minimal costs of school books and after-school activities, let alone purchasing a computer.

In addition, the town budget for Ma’ale Adumim is already stretched with the many challenges of the Corona crisis. Although the computers were offered at a special discounted price, assistance was required for the project to get underway. So they approached the International Christian Embassy Jerusalem for help, and we quickly agreed to purchase computers for 69 families.

Nicole Yoder, ICEJ Vice President for Aid and Aliyah, presented the computers to students at a ceremony last week hosted by Mayor Benny Kashriel. Expressing his gratitude, Mayor Kashriel thanked the ICEJ and our donors worldwide for extending a hand of friendship in this time of difficulty, not only by giving these computers but also by providing hot meals to many elderly residents in his town over recent months.

Unfortunately, due to Coronavirus restrictions which limit gatherings outside to 20 people, only three of the 69 families receiving computers could attend the ceremony, with the remainder receiving the computers the following week.

*Ayala, an Ethiopian Israeli mother, was so thankful and said that she has “no words to express what a tremendous help this is for them.”

Meanwhile *Meital, a single mother of three, shared how providing for her children alone is so difficult, and that there was no way that she could have purchased this computer. Her daughter, *Batya, also eagerly expressed that there are many things that she would like to learn on the computer, including English, and did not think it would be too difficult to learn how to use it.

Each family receiving a computer will also receive an internet connection, have a technician to install the computer, and receive basic instructions on how to use it. Soon, a whole new world of opportunity will be within their reach.

Nicole Yoder shared at the ceremony how inspired she is to see how the people of Israel, from medical professionals to ordinary citizens, are using their knowledge, talent and energy to help others in a myriad of ways during the COVID-19 threat. “Giving these computers is one way that Christians can do our part to help in this crisis, by allowing young people to continue their studies in these challenging times”, she said.

Thank you for easing the economic stress on these families and for investing in the future of Israel!

(*Real names have been changed.)

Please donate today to the ICEJ to help other needy families in Israel get through the current crisis.
Give today at:
icej.org/crisis
 

 

A Daughter of Israel Finally Comes Home

The ICEJ is excited to report that we have reached our goal for the month of July in the ‘Rescue250’ campaign! As of Monday (27/07/20), the ICEJ has brought well over 250 Jewish immigrants on Aliyah “rescue flights” this month, thanks to the faithful and generous support of Christians around the world. This is a prophetic and humanitarian mission, and we are amazed that the door of Aliyah has remained opened despite the grounding of flights worldwide due to Corona.

The Rescue250 campaign is a challenge to Christian supporters of Israel around the globe to partner with the ICEJ in keeping up our current pace of flying at least 250 Jews per month home to Israel while the Coronavirus pandemic is still impacting the world.

Last week, one of the three rescue flights sponsored by ICEJ brought Nina Akselrud and her son to Israel. Nina's arrival meant a family reunion after 30 years of separation. Her parents and younger brother made Aliyah in 1991. Nina was a young girl who made the difficult decision to stay in Russia instead of following her family to Israel. “Now I think that it was a big mistake and I should have gone”, Nina said this week.

The history of her family is closely connected to the history of Jews in Russia, including the sad moments like pogroms and wars.

“I always felt myself as a part of the Jewish people thanks to my relatives, grandparents, and their stories about our family”, Nina explained. “All Jews are special, unique people to me, part of my family and my future.”

Even though Nina’s father and brother had been trying to persuade her to make Aliyah for many years, she went her own long way. But in the end, she clearly realized that Israel is the country where she whole-heartedly belongs.

“There were a number of things in my life and in my birth country that influenced my decision to come live in Israel”, said Nina. “In 2018, I started to work in public media. And I began to read and write a lot about the news in my birth country. I looked from a new perspective on the economic and political situation in the country. I believe that a person can choose where to live. And I am very glad that my son and I have the opportunity to now live in Israel”, she stated.

By the time Nina made the decision to move to Israel, she faced being misunderstood by her friends.

“My friends said that I am crazy for wanting to go [to Israel]. Many of them said that I will have to overcome many difficulties while starting a new life”, she shared. “But I'm ready for that. I told them I want to have more opportunities for myself and my son. I want to live in a democratic state.”

In her heart, Nina already has a sense of admiration for this small but very courageous country, with its ancient history and bright prospects for development.

It is amazing to witness how many of these Jewish people who make Aliyah are thinking not only about how to improve their own lives, but also about what they can do to strengthen and build their new nation.

“I want to be there and be useful to this Land. I hope that I will succeed”, Nina confided. “I am sure that a happy future waits for me and my son in Israel”, she concluded.

Nina then added: “I was amazed when I learned that Christians who love Israel supported my Aliyah. Indeed, it is the time of miracles!”

The Christian Embassy welcomed another 49 Jewish immigrants on a pair of Aliyah flights on Monday and Tuesday of this week, pushing our total for July up to almost 300 olim brought on Aliyah rescue flights this month. But with August now here, it is time to start the challenge over again and ask for your help in bringing at least 250 more Jews to Israel this coming month. You can reserve a place on an Aliyah rescue flight for a deserving Jewish person or family in need.

Together, let us continue to play our key role in the great, prophetic Ingathering of Israel even during this most unusual season of the Corona virus.

 

Book a seat today and follow our progress in this urgent Rescue250 campaign! Go to: on.icej.org/rescue250

  

Lifting the Druze of Israel

Over the decades, the ICEJ has seen the great importance of assisting all the different peoples living in the Land of Israel, including minorities, in order to strengthen Israeli society as a whole. This has led the Christian Embassy to forge a close partnership over the past eight years with Druze leaders in the North, which is not only lifting the Druze community but also has become a strong point of reconciliation between Jews and Arabs overall.

First of all, you may ask: “Who are the Druze people?”

The Druze are a unique people indigenous to the Middle East who claim descent back to Jethro, the father-in-law of Moses in the Bible. Many centuries ago, they fled the deserts of Midian and found refuge on several high mountain ridges in today’s Israel, Lebanon and Syria – including the Carmel, Galilee and Hermon ranges. Although they speak Arabic, they retain their own ethnic identity. In addition, the Druze are not Muslims but have their own secretive religion which some scholars say contains a mix of Islam, Gnosticism and Greek philosophy. And in general, they tend to be very loyal to the rulers in the land where they live.

The Druze in Israel make up only 1.6% of the population. The Carmel and Galilee Druze (and increasingly the Druze on the Hermon) are very loyal to the State of Israel and in fact they consider it a great honour to serve in the Israeli army to defend their homeland.

A small ICEJ delegation travelled to northern Israel recently to visit several Druze communities and see how some of our ongoing social projects were faring. Our first stop was a Druze elementary school, where we saw teachers interacting with students by singing and dancing to help the children learn in a fun yet memorable way. Some of these young Druze students have a strong desire to further their education at the university level. However, many of their families cannot afford the costs. Therefore, the ICEJ has given scholarships to a number of Druze students in recent years to help them continue their education after high school.

One young Druze lady named Maram Mansor, from Isfiya, was on hand to say that thanks to an ICEJ scholarship she is studying Mathematics, Arabic Language, and Literature at Haifa University. She was most grateful, saying: “I was always dreaming when I was in high school, I really wanted to be a Mathematics teacher. But I was afraid because of my financial status. But now I know that no one has to worry as long as we have generous people and organisations like the International Christian Embassy. So thank you so much… You have made our dreams come true!”

Meanwhile, Maimoon Azmi, also from Isfiya, has been working for the Ministry of Finance for over 13 years now, and credits his success to an ICEJ scholarship. “Thanks to the International Christian Embassy, I had the opportunity to go and study for my first degree… It opened a lot of doors for me. I don’t know if I would have finished school without this scholarship.” 

The next stop was at a Druze middle school, and upon our arrival the students lined the entryway with drums and other instruments to offer us a warm musical welcome. After the grand entrance, another group of students performed a traditional Druze dance in colourful national costumes. This was all meant to say thanks for the support of the ICEJ and several local welfare organizations who are helping with special projects at their school.

After these performances, we stepped into the classrooms to see the students learning through interactive games on the new computers donated by the Christian Embassy. Nicole Yoder, the ICEJ’s Vice President for AID and Aliyah, had the honour of cutting a ribbon celebrating the five new classrooms now equipped with computers. One student named Reem explained how playing games on the computers are helping her to learn English.

After we engaged with the students, Druze community leaders presented our delegation with a beautiful gold plaque to express their appreciation for all the support Christians around the world have been giving to Druze students and communities throughout Israel.

Bahij Mansour, Mayor of Isfiya, also offered his thanks, saying: “We have 17 Druze villages in the state of Israel, and in every place we have something that the Christian Embassy has created. A library, a scholarship, many things. We think the Christian Embassy is taking amazing steps to improve the education system in our community. It is an amazing contribution that you are bringing.”

We ended our visit sitting around a large table with several Druze leaders and enjoyed their spectacular hospitality and a delicious meal of fresh salads, side dishes, meats, dessert and coffee. Several of our Druze hosts shared one word to describe their special people: The Druze people are… “proud”… “brave”… “amazing”… “strong”… “adventurous”… “loyal”… and “peace-loving”.

The Druze are an important part of Israeli society, and we are grateful for the opportunity to help support and strengthen them for a better future here in the Land of Israel.

Partner with us in giving a hope and a future to the children of Israel!

 

Watch this video below to meet some of the Druze students and hear their success stories!

I am finally planting roots for my family in Israel

Over recent months, the ICEJ has sponsored special ‘evacuation flights’ every week bringing Jews on Aliyah to Israel, despite the Corona crisis. There are three such Aliyah flights coming this week alone, all arranged by the Jewish Agency and sponsored by the Christian Embassy. This includes 35 Russian Jews who landed on Monday, another 65 who will arrive today (Tuesday), and 34 Ethiopian Jews scheduled to come on Thursday. With the latest cancellations of most regular flights into Israel, these are about the only flights currently arriving at Ben-Gurion airport, which only adds to the miracle now taking place thanks to our faithful supporters.

Each Jewish olim (newcomer) on board these flights has their own family history and unique life stories on how they came to make Aliyah, but all are united by the sense of joy and expectation concerning their new home in Israel. Last week, the Klokov family arrived from the Far East as part of a group of 61 new Jewish immigrants from all across Russia who came on a rescue flight funded by the Christian Embassy. Eugene Klokov came with his wife and two children, and he shared his fascinating story with us.

Eugene was born in 1987, in the city of Khabarovsk, in far eastern regions of Russia. All his life, he knew about his Jewish identity and wanted to explore it further.

“I was fascinated by this and for many years I have worked on re-creating my family tree,” said Eugene. “I was very interested to know who my distant ancestors were. I collected the information bit by bit. Sometimes, I just got on a plane and flew to relatives across the former Soviet Union whom I had never seen.”

Most of his relatives lived in small Jewish communities. And for them, Eugene became a hope – a hope that the family history would not vanish without a trace, but will be passed on to the next generation.

Eugene’s grandparents were from Crimea and the Ukraine. But after graduating from university, they were moved to the Far East to work by the Soviet state, which wanted to ‘populate’ the vast, empty region. Soviet officials said it would be “for just a few years.”

“It wasn't surprising that they were sent east,” said Eugene. “The central government didn't want Jews anywhere near the center of the country.”

The system was set up so that after five mandatory years of work, the Soviets offered his grandparents a small promotion if they stayed a few more years, and so on and so forth.

“My grandfather and grandmother lived all their lives with the thought that they would move the next year,” he explained. “They lived with packed suitcases, they didn’t buy new furniture, they literally limited themselves in everything. Yet eventually, they never left.”

“Maybe it is no coincidence that my grandparents never grew roots in Russia. Maybe it is no coincidence that I am here now, of all times, during a pandemic, finally planting roots for my family in Israel,” Eugene confided.

From an early age, Eugene passionately studied the history of Israel, which he viewed as inextricably linked with his family history. Once, Eugene was able to take part in a Taglit (Birthright) tour of Israel. During a visit to Yad Vashem in Jerusalem, he was shocked to find information about his relatives murdered in the Holocaust, including children as young as four years old.

“I felt a chill come over me when I looked at these photos and records of eyewitness testimony. And when I held in my hands these old documents, I felt very strong feelings. A huge desire arose within me to do something for the Land of Israel,” said Eugene. But he quickly adds that this was not his only reason for making Aliyah.

“I wanted to show my children a different life, I wanted a different future for them. Education, medicine, and the caring attitude of the government towards its people made me feel Israel can be my home,” said Eugene.

After making Aliyah last week, Eugene is filled with great expectations. He wants to start a new business in construction.

“I believe that our life consists of actions,” he insists. “We can make history today, here and now!”

“I would be extremely happy if my children appreciate what I am doing, that I moved from a distant town in Russia to the center of the world, to the country that was waiting for me,” Eugene concluded.

Indeed, the Klokov family started their Aliyah journey home nearly a century ago and thousands of miles away from even their old home. Now they are finally home, in Israel.

 

Please help us bring more Jewish families like the Klokovs home to Israel. It is still possible thanks to the ‘evacuation flights’ the ICEJ is now sponsoring. We have brought over 1250 Jews to Israel over the past five months of the Corona crisis. And to build on this remarkable achievement, we are now calling on our Christian friends and supporters worldwide to join us in helping more Jews reach Israel safely through our “Rescue250” campaign.

 

The Rescue250 campaign is a challenge to Christian supporters of Israel around the globe to partner with the ICEJ is keeping up our current pace of flying at least 250 Jews per month home to Israel while the Coronavirus pandemic is still severely impacting the world. This is both a prophetic mandate and a humanitarian mission, and we welcome your involvement in making this miracle happen.

Learn more on how you can be a part of this urgent campaign at: on.icej.org/rescue250

  

A Day With the Druze

With an early start to a sunshine-filled day, there was much excitement as the ICEJ staff set out from Jerusalem one morning in early June to visit the Druze community of Hurfeish, just four kilometers from Israel’s northern border with Lebanon.

A close-knit, Arabic-speaking minority, the Israeli Druze mostly live in small towns nestled in the Carmel range, Upper Galilee and Golan Heights. While their unique cultural and religious practices differentiate them from other Israeli Arabs, they especially stand out due to their steadfast loyalty as Israeli citizens who serve honorably and with pride in the Israel Defense Force (IDF).

Some 250,000 Israelis live within nine kilometers of the Lebanese border in a hilly, pastoral area that belies underlying tensions. Stick around for a while, though, and one is likely to experience a disruption of that deceptive tranquility – a fact underlined by the recent IDF discovery of six underground tunnels which Hizbullah terrorists intended to use to infiltrate Israeli border communities.

Unfortunately, a severe shortage of adequate bomb shelters along the border means that communities there are ill-prepared for Hizbullah rocket attacks. This is a reality that authorities are working to correct and the ICEJ, due to the generosity of our German supporters, will soon deliver two portable shelters to the Hurfeish Cultural Center – a focus of Druze youth activity and community life.

However, those living in the northern periphery far from the economic center of the country face other challenges as well. High rates of unemployment or under-employment as well as a lack of urban development create barriers to economic growth for both individuals and communities. Investment in education is essential to improve opportunities for women and young people.

To address these needs, the ICEJ is enriching Druze schools in partnership with local leaders by providing such things as computer labs, upgrading libraries, or adding a music room. Our most recent project includes sponsoring an Aviators Program that works in conjunction with the Israeli Air Force and the Ilan Ramon Centre. Currently two Druze schools participate in this program, which aims to develop positive social and ethical leadership among youth, setting a foundation for responsible citizenship.

Mentors encourage young people to dream big, then motivate them to achieve success by accomplishing small goals one step at a time. One highlight of the program is interaction with Israeli air force pilots, who act as role-models and meet monthly with the youth to inspire them towards excellence at school and in all they do.

A local English teacher confided that she wished her own children were able to be in this program. “We’ve seen such amazing change and progress in the children participating that we couldn’t believe it”, she said. “We’re hoping to expand to all schools in the Druze sector.”

The ICEJ staff outing then took us to Misgav Am, which provides a high vantage point for looking over the border into southern Lebanon. Afterwards, we tasted warm Druze hospitality while harvesting ripe-red cherries at an orchard in the Golan, followed by a satisfying Mediterranean-style dinner in Kfar Buq’ata, a Druze village near the foot of Mt. Hermon. Before travelling back to Jerusalem, our host, Mofid Aamer, shared about his 28 years of service in the IDF Special Units and his passion for education to help the next generation achieve a better future. We share his passion to strengthen Israel and know that lifting up all her people is key to realizing it.

Your generous giving enables us to provide a future and a hope to the next generation in Israel.

Please donate to the ICEJ today!

I am finally planting roots for my family in Israel

Over recent months, the ICEJ has sponsored special ‘evacuation flights’ every week bringing Jews on Aliyah to Israel, despite the coronavirus crisis. There are three such Aliyah flights coming this week alone, all arranged by the Jewish Agency and sponsored by the Christian Embassy. This includes 100 Russian and 34 Ethiopian Jews all who arrived in the last week. With the latest cancellations of most regular flights into Israel, these are about the only flights currently arriving at Ben-Gurion airport, which only adds to the miracle now taking place thanks to our faithful supporters.

Each Jewish olim (newcomer) on board these flights has their own family history and unique life stories on how they came to make Aliyah, but all are united by the sense of joy and expectation concerning their new home in Israel. Last week, the Klokov family arrived from the Far East as part of a group of 61 new Jewish immigrants from all across Russia who came on a rescue flight funded by the Christian Embassy. Eugene Klokov came with his wife and two children, and he shared his fascinating story with us.

Eugene was born in 1987, in the city of Khabarovsk, in far eastern regions of Russia. All his life, he knew about his Jewish identity and wanted to explore it further.

“I was fascinated by this and for many years I have worked on re-creating my family tree,” said Eugene. “I was very interested to know who my distant ancestors were. I collected the information bit by bit. Sometimes, I just got on a plane and flew to relatives across the former Soviet Union whom I had never seen.”

Most of his relatives lived in small Jewish communities. And for them, Eugene became a hope – a hope that the family history would not vanish without a trace, but will be passed on to the next generation.

Eugene’s grandparents were from Crimea and the Ukraine. But after graduating from university, they were moved to the Far East to work by the Soviet state, which wanted to ‘populate’ the vast, empty region. Soviet officials said it would be “for just a few years.”

“It wasn't surprising that they were sent east,” said Eugene. “The central government didn't want Jews anywhere near the center of the country.”

The system was set up so that after five mandatory years of work, the Soviets offered his grandparents a small promotion if they stayed a few more years, and so on and so forth.

“My grandfather and grandmother lived all their lives with the thought that they would move the next year,” he explained. “They lived with packed suitcases, they didn’t buy new furniture, they literally limited themselves in everything. Yet eventually, they never left.”

“Maybe it is no coincidence that my grandparents never grew roots in Russia. Maybe it is no coincidence that I am here now, of all times, during a pandemic, finally planting roots for my family in Israel,” Eugene confided.

From an early age, Eugene passionately studied the history of Israel, which he viewed as inextricably linked with his family history. Once, Eugene was able to take part in a Taglit (Birthright) tour of Israel. During a visit to Yad Vashem in Jerusalem, he was shocked to find information about his relatives murdered in the Holocaust, including children as young as four years old.

“I felt a chill come over me when I looked at these photos and records of eyewitness testimony. And when I held in my hands these old documents, I felt very strong feelings. A huge desire arose within me to do something for the Land of Israel,” said Eugene. But he quickly adds that this was not his only reason for making Aliyah.

“I wanted to show my children a different life, I wanted a different future for them. Education, medicine, and the caring attitude of the government towards its people made me feel Israel can be my home,” said Eugene.

After making Aliyah last week, Eugene is filled with great expectations. He wants to start a new business in construction.

“I believe that our life consists of actions,” he insists. “We can make history today, here and now!”

“I would be extremely happy if my children appreciate what I am doing, that I moved from a distant town in Russia to the center of the world, to the country that was waiting for me,” Eugene concluded.

Indeed, the Klokov family started their Aliyah journey home nearly a century ago and thousands of miles away from even their old home. Now they are finally home, in Israel.

Please help us bring more Jewish families like the Klokovs home to Israel. It is still possible thanks to the ‘evacuation flights’ the ICEJ is now sponsoring. We have brought over 1250 Jews to Israel over the past five months of the coronavirus crisis. And to build on this remarkable achievement, we are now calling on our Christian friends and supporters worldwide to join us in helping more Jews reach Israel safely through our “Rescue250” campaign.

The Rescue250 campaign is a challenge to Christian supporters of Israel around the globe to partner with the ICEJ is keeping up our current pace of flying at least 250 Jews per month home to Israel while the coronavirus pandemic is still severely impacting the world. This is both a prophetic mandate and a humanitarian mission, and we welcome your involvement in making this miracle happen.

 

Learn more on how you can be a part of this urgent campaign at: on.icej.org/rescue250

  

A Hidden Story Revealed

The thought of Leah, a 90-year-old Holocaust Survivor, being alone through the Jewish holidays suddenly prompted Corrie of ICEJ Homecare to call on her even though it was a non-working day. Corrie and her assistant entered Leah’s room, and within mere moments of hearing Corrie’s familiar voice, Leah passed away. Despite a heavy heart, Corrie was still thankful for the Lord’s leading that day which brought her to Leah’s bedside so she was not alone in her last moments in this life.

Twelve years before, this highly educated lady suffered a stroke which robbed her freedom and mobility soon after immigrating to Israel. She was forced to move in with family members who found it difficult to care for an elderly invalid, so Homecare’s weekly visits were a highlight. “My week goes from Wednesday to Wednesday because then you are coming,” Leah would often tell the ICEJ team.

Not long before Leah died, Corrie asked her, “What were the highlights of your life?” She responded, “I have no highlights. My life was difficult.” As a twelve-year-old, Leah and her family fled Rostov in Russia, where the occupying Nazis mass murdered between 15,000 and 18,000 Jews. The family knew only fear, hunger and exhaustion as they walked for days on end towards the unknown.

Corrie gently persevered if there was anything for which she was particularly thankful. As she held her hand, Leah began to share:

“After days of walking we reached a farm and were given a place of safety in the pig barn. That evening, through the kindness of the farmer, we received a bowl of soup. I never ate in my life such a good and tasty soup, and after that I made a pillow from hay to sleep on that night. That evening, as a girl of 12 years old, I promised myself to be thankful the rest of my life for this plate of soup and the pillow of hay.”

Corrie had no words but gave Leah a hug. She thanked God for the ability to walk alongside this precious Russian Jewish lady.

There are others like Leah who carry hidden stories in their hearts from past traumas, yet we are honoured to share these difficult and precious memories with them. 

Partner with ICEJ Homecare today, as we give God’s hope to elderly Jews in their last days!

An Aliyah flight that saved a life

Israel has always been open to Jews wanting to return home, even during the Corona crisis, although it does take time to document one’s Jewish heritage. But for one Russian Jewish family who arrived last week, there was no time to waste. Their seven year-old son was battling lymphatic cancer and needed life-saving treatments in Israel. So they were fast-tracked for citizenship in only one week’s time, and the young boy arrived on June 30th on a rescue flight sponsored by the International Christian Embassy Jerusalem. His story is one of a miracle still in the making.

Since late February, the ICEJ has managed to bring over 1,100 Jewish immigrants home to Israel on Aliyah flights arranged by the Jewish Agency. With most global travel halted, these “evacuation flights” are allowed to bring new immigrants already approved for Israeli citizenship. Those on board are being given priority due to urgent health concerns, rising antisemitism, and poor socio-economic conditions. For the Zheleznyak family, their situation indeed was desperate.

Their troubles began some 18 months ago when Boris Zheleznyak and his wife learned their son Maxim had acute leukemia. “Still, the local doctors said that there was nothing to worry about, there was a 95% chance of success,” Boris told Israeli media this week.

Maxim began treatment in one of Russia’s best hospitals, and his parents devoted all their strength to caring for him, as his mother even left her work.

“Many now complain about how difficult it is to get through quarantine. For our family it has been going on for a year and a half. In order not to bring infection into the house, we refused to meet with relatives and friends. Our whole life was divided between the house and the hospital,” said Boris.

Like many cancer patients, brief signs of improvement in Maxim’s condition gave way to setbacks and long days of despair, which were only worsened by the COVID-19 pandemic. When recent test results showed a return of the cancer, they started searching for more aggressive treatments, such as a bone marrow transplant. It soon became obvious that the answer could only be found abroad.

Then a friend told them about another Jewish family who were in a similar situation. They had made Aliyah to Israel and were now receiving treatments at the Schneider Children’s Hospital, in Petah Tikvah. So on June 20, Boris wrote a letter to the Jewish Agency with a desperate plea: Let us enter Israel to save our son.

 

Boris was not so optimistic. But the next day he received a call from the local Jewish Agency representative, who said: “We Israelis never leave children without help.” He then did everything possible to ensure the Zheleznyak family’s paperwork was quickly completed in both Israel and Russia.

Miraculously, in just four days, the anxious family had received their passports, and four days later they were on a flight bound for Tel Aviv sponsored by the Christian Embassy.

When the Zheleznyak family landed on June 30, they were met at the airport by Jewish Agency staff. Maxim and his parents were taken through the “green corridor,” and presented with official documents for new arrivals and even medical insurance.

“When will the insurance become active?” – the parents asked nervously. “Like all olim, from the very moment you receive it,” they were told.

The Zheleznyak family still do not believe they are already in Israel, it has all happened so fast.

“On June 16, we received dramatic test results that Maxim’s cancer has gotten worse, and two weeks later we landed at Ben Gurion airport,” Boris explained. “This is a real miracle, because we did not even have passports for international travel... No country in the world would ever grant us citizenship this way, in a matter of days.”

“For the first time after a year and a half of a desperate struggle for the life of our son, we have hope for salvation,” Boris concluded.

Facing a life-threatening disease, amid a global pandemic, with nearly all flights cancelled, and normally staring at months and months of immigration paperwork, the Zheleznyak family is truly in the midst of a miracle. But now they need our continued prayers, that young Maxim will finally beat cancer and grow up healthy and happy in Israel. 

 

 

There are also many more Jewish families intensely longing to reach Israel amid the Corona crisis. Thanks to Christian donors around the world, the ICEJ has managed to bring over 1,100 Jewish immigrants home to Israel on Aliyah flights so far this year. That is a remarkable rate of some 250 olim (newcomers) per month even during the Corona shutdowns.

  

  With all the economic instability and rising antisemitism worldwide, we are now challenging our friends and supporters to help us maintain that pace in the critical months ahead, when Aliyah is expected to increase. Please join our ‘Rescue250’ campaign! Help us to fly another 250 Jews to Israel in the month of July.

Book a seat today at: on.icej.org/rescue250  

 

Share this: